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DARRICK WOOD SCHOOL
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Curriculum
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Design & Technology

Art & Design

Art

Key Stage 3:

In KS3 the art curriculum is focussed on developing students’ artistic skills in drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture. Students study the lives and works of many artists to see how and why they make art.

What do students learn in KS3?

Key Stage 4:

Course Content

The Art and Design course offers a wide variety of possibilities and ways in which to work. Each student will work in all the following areas:

  • Painting
  • Drawing
  • Sculpture
  • Printmaking
  • Photography

These areas will form the basis of the Personal Portfolio. An important area of this course will involve students looking at the work of artists, designers and crafts people alongside their own - this will involve visits to national galleries and exhibitions.

The Personal Portfolio will be submitted with the externally set assignment and will form part of an exhibition.

Students also undertake self-assessment and self-evaluation of their own and other student’s work.

A strong ability to record and observe visual information is required and the ability to work independently in research and development of ideas.

Assessment and Examinations
  • Component 1 - Personal Portfolio - 60%
  • Component 2 - Externally Set Assignment - 40%

Each project is assessed on an on-going basis.

Sixth Form:

Course Content

Students work with a variety of media including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and photography to create their own artwork on different themes. Analysis of artists’ work and annotation is included. Observational drawing is an important part of the course. Students will exhibit their work at the end of the course.

Course Structure
  • Component 1: Personal Investigation with written component
  • Component 2: Externally Set Assignment, 15-hour examination
Assessment

4 assessment objectives for each unit and examination

  • Component 1 - 60%
  • Component 2 - 40%

Food and Nutrition

Key Stage 3:

Students are taught on a rotational system with the other Design and Technology subjects. Groups are mixed in ability.

What do students learn in KS3?

Key Stage 4:

Course Content

There are six areas of content:

  • Food Commodities – staple foods, fruit and veg, meat, fish and dairy, fats and oils.
  • Principles of Nutrition – protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals.
  • Diet and good health – balanced diets and energy requirements.
  • The science of food – the effect of cooking on food and food spoilage.
  • Where food comes from – food provenance and manufacturing.
  • Cooking and food preparation – factors affecting food choice and developing recipes and menus.
Students will be expected to bring ingredients twice a week for practical lessons and to wear catering whites.

The qualities students need are:

  • Reliability
  • Commitment
  • Punctuality and good attendance
  • The ability to work as part of a team
Assessment
  1. Food Science based investigation: NEA (non-examination assessment) (15%). This is an 8 hour controlled assessment, completed in September/October of Year 11. It will develop knowledge in relation to scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food.
  2. Practical Examination: NEA (35%). This is a 12 hour assessment, including a 3 hour practical examination, which is completed between November and January in Year 11. You have to prepare, cook and present a meal to show knowledge of planning, preparation, cooking and presentation of food.
  3. A written examination (50%) at the end of Year 11. This is 1 hour 45 minutes.

Resistant Materials

Resistant Materials

Key Stage 3:

Key Stage 3 Design and Technology is taught in rotations.

What do students learn in KS3?

Key Stage 4:

Course Content

GCSE Design and Technology will prepare students to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world. Students will gain awareness and learn from wider influences on Design and Technology including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students will get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise.

The GCSE allows students to study core technical skills, which will include all areas of technology including:

  • Resistant Materials
  • Textile Technology
  • Product Design
  • System and Control

In addition, students will also study designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth. In order to be successful in this subject you need to be able to manipulate materials confidently.


Assessment and Examinations
Component 1: Single tier written paper (50%)

Students will sit a two-hour examination testing them on the three main elements of the course:

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles (Resistant Materials)
  • Designing and making principles

In addition, 15% of the written paper will examine the student’s mathematical knowledge and understanding.

Component 2: Non-Examined Assessment (50%)

Students spend the majority of Year 11 on a single design and make task in which they identify, research and solve a design problem set by the examination board.


Textiles

Key Stage 3:

Key Stage 3 Design and Technology is taught in rotations.

What do students learn in KS3?

Key Stage 4:

Course Content

This course is suitable for students who want to study fashion and textiles in a hands on, practical way that helps them develop their knowledge, skills and experience that could open the door to a career in the Fashion/Art industry. Students will need to be self-motivated and have an interest in creativity, design and making.

In the course students will develop:

  • A wide range of practical making skills incorporating surface embellishment, constructed textiles print and dyed textiles, combining materials and colouring fabrics.
  • Creativity in experimenting, developing and refining ideas to an outcome.

Assessment

In each of the two components studied, students must record, develop and refine their ideas, observations and insights, both visually and through written annotation, as work progresses. Both components are non-examination assessments (NEA) set and marked by the school and moderated by AQA. Students who complete the course will achieve a GCSE pass with grades ranging from 9 – 1.

Component 1: Portfolio (60% of overall mark)

Students produce a sustained project in response to a subject, theme, task or brief to show the journey from the initial ideas to realisation, drawing together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding developed during their course of study.

Students also produce a selection of further work which has been undertaken during their studies, as a result of exposure to activities such as trials and experiments, skills-based workshops, smaller projects, responses to gallery, museum or site visits, independent study or any group work undertaken.

Component 2: Externally set assignment (40% of overall mark)

AQA will provide an externally set assignment that features seven tasks; students will choose one of these tasks and provide an extended creative response to demonstrate their ability to collate areas of knowledge, skills and understanding. Students are given preparation time, plus ten hours of unaided but supervised time in which to complete an extended creative response to their chosen task.

Sixth Form:

Course Content

Textile Design encompasses a very broad range of materials, techniques and processes, including a growing number of interdisciplinary approaches. These comprise woven, embroidered, knitted, printed, painted, dyed, manipulated, embellished and constructional methods which are utilised to produce a great variety of textile outcomes that include costume and fashion design, accessories and body adornment. The range is increasing as new materials and technologies emerge.

Course Structure
Component 1 - Personal investigation
  1. A major in-depth critical, practical and theoretical investigative project/portfolio and outcome/s based on themes and subject matter that have personal significance
  2. An extended written element of 1000 words minimum, which may contain images and texts and must clearly relate to practical and theoretical work using an appropriate working vocabulary and specialist terminology
Component 2 - Externally set assignment
  • Part 1: Preparatory study period
  • Part 2: 15 hour period of sustained focus work
Assessment

Component 1 = 60% (120 marks)

Component 2 = 40% (80 marks)

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